Tracking PixelI've partnered with AT&T to bring you this It Can Wait campaign. Take the 21-Day pledge with me – and please don't let it stop after 21 days!

Rarely are we kid-free, so when the opportunity presents itself, we take it. When our friends Noelle and Sal offered to keep all three girls tonight, of course we didn't stick around long enough for them to change their minds. We dropped them off, then headed to dinner. On the way there, we noticed some flashing lights but not a whole lot of traffic so honestly we didn't pay it much attention.

Then, out of the middle of nowhere, we saw several police vehicles, traffic cones, flares, and a mangled motorcycle. Busted all to pieces. And a dead body right next to it.

He was partially covered, but you guys know how Rachel is about death… she FREAKS OUT. I was afraid she was going to pass out, and she was driving, so obviously that wasn't a good thing. I took her mind off of it, we went to dinner, and I drove home. She couldn't stop thinking about what we had seen, so I used that as an opportunity to talk to her about her own distracted driving.

We don't know how the accident happened, or why a man's life was taken far too soon, but we do know that accidents – even fatal ones – happen far too often. Even though 95% of people say they disapprove of distracted driving, yet more than 431,000 crashes a year are caused by it. Any time I post about people texting and driving (I call people out on a regular basis – but never while I'm driving), the responses pour in about how you guys would never drive distracted.

The truth is, even if we aren't texting, distracted driving is a huge problem. In order to be completely focused on the road and our surroundings, our phones need to be out of sight and out of mind. No voice commands, no checking text messages, no reading emails at red lights. Distracted driving is more than just texting. And it can be deadly.

Take the Challenge: It Can Wait

What is a life worth?

I am taking a semester off from college, but when I'm in school, I study Mortuary Science. I love learning about all of the technical aspects of death. But there's an entirely different side: who they leave behind. The entire time Rachel and I were at dinner last night, we were thinking about the man's family. Did he have kids? Did he have a wife? Do they even know he's gone? Could his wife tell he died, like they do in those Lifetime movies? They just know. Did he have parents in town visiting? Was he running to the grocery store to get dinner? So many questions, and no answers. Just sadness. And if you were the one that was distracted while driving and you end up being responsible for someone else's death, I imagine with sadness also comes regret and guilt. Was that notification worth it? Could it ever be? No.

Leave a comment if you'll take the pledge with me.

NO cell phones while driving – no notifications. Out of sight, out of mind. Also be sure to follow me on Twitter (@slapdashmom) and Facebook (/slapdashmom) because I'll be talking about this a lot over the next few weeks!

If you're in, download the AT&T DriveMode app (Google Play | iTunes)

AT&T DriveMode is a free, safe driving app that helps prevent distractions while driving by silencing incoming alerts. It activates when speed reaches 15 MPH and deactivates when speed drops below 15 MPH for 2-3 minutes. This is the perfect app to prevent me from stoplight email checking.

This is great if you have teens that are driving (or will be driving soon): Parental Alerts that send an SMS to the parent if the app is turned off or if auto-mode is disabled. BAM. :) Auto-reply responses to SMS and MMS messages with a personalized safe driving message. I need this so Rachel can see that I'm driving, without me having to tell her that I'm driving.

This has been a sponsored post on behalf of AT&T.